A Different Kind of Scrutiny

For me, this was just another reminder that how we view powerful men and powerful women is fundamentally different. When SNL is mocking Spicer, they focus on who he is and what he’s saying. Huckabee Sanders takes heat for her appearance. Shouldn’t they make fun of her job?

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Like a lot of liberals, I’ve been watching an inordinate amount of late night television since the election.  I have to say, though, the most recent SNL jibe made me a little uncomfortable.

SNL’s version Sarah Huckabee Sanders, Deputy Press Secretary, made her debut just like the real-life counterpart has been surfacing more and more as Spicer fades into the background.  But how they chose to portray her frustrates me.

For their ridicule of Spicer, the writers have focused primarily on his personality, from his odd gum-chewing habits to his frustrated and at times condescending attitude towards the press (cranked up to the eleven, of course).

In the brief time that Huckabee Sanders got the podium, there were two jokes directed at her: one about her weight, and one about her fashion sense.  Granted, we don’t know much about her personally yet like we do Spicer.  But you’d think a writing team could take the time to Google her and find some weird quirk to ridicule instead.

For me, this was just another reminder that how we view powerful men and powerful women is fundamentally different.  When SNL’s writers are mocking Spicer, they focus on who he is and what he’s saying.  Huckabee Sanders takes heat for her appearance.  Shouldn’t they be making fun of her job?

Even in comedy, women find themselves the victim of a very different kind of scrutiny.  I might not agree with Huckabee Sanders politically, but as a woman, I can sympathize.

Don’t misunderstand me.  I almost cried laughing at McCarthy’s Spicer riding through the streets of New York on a motorized podium.  But if Spicer does go the way of Michael Flynn and James Comey, I hope that SNL’s writers find a few more creative digs at Huckabee Sanders.

1 thought on “A Different Kind of Scrutiny”

  1. They’d done better using context boxes using ‘Where’s Waldo?’, which given the antics strikes me as apt, but I do have a dry sense of humor.

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